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LeanMail Suite Demo Videos

Prioritize demo

Plan demo

InstantArchive demo

LeanMail Suite Features Videos

Software installation

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Prioritize and Pareto

Prioritize buttons and view

Plan post it notes

Plan overflow folder

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InstantArchive Options feature

InstantArchive Categories function

InstantThanks

LeanMail Suite Problem Solving

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FAQs

LeanMail Suite FAQs

What is LeanMail?

LeanMail is a group of customizable solutions for managing email that combines best in-class practices with proprietary add-ins that seamlessly bolt onto Microsoft Outlook.

Each LeanMail solution, or module, is independent from the other, but can be combined to satisfy your specific email management needs.

Among the challenges that LeanMail solves are: high volume, prioritization, planning, keeping track, filing and finding, and shared inboxes.

 

How does LeanMail work?

LeanMail follows a two-step process of first sorting your mails by priority before taking action on the ones you can and planning the rest.

LeanMail has an array of tools that filter, automate, and create work-flows that grease the wheel of execution. There’s no dragging and dropping into different folders and then trying to keep track of it all. Instead LeanMail uses a Kanban or pull system to ensure you’re efficiently doing the most work possible without overburdening you, causing stress.

Because we all work differently, LeanMail has several components called modules that can be used separately or in combination.

While the LeanMail software can be purchased without training, it rarely is because the training is an important part of the solution.

Most of the training centers upon building the new habit. As a matter of fact, learning the basic functionality of LeanMail only takes a few minutes. Learning the functionality of a piano, just a few seconds! But as we all know, no one becomes a virtuoso without a lot of practice and a great teacher.

Do you have a trial version of LeanMail?

We have a 30-day free trial of all our LeanMail components.

What does LeanMail cost?

Our software retails for between €3 and €9 per month per user. Licenses are paid annually and renewed automatically if we do not receive notification within 60 days of the new license period.

Training costs vary greatly. Contact us for more information.

How can I know which solution is best for me?

The quickest way to find out what your current needs are is to take this survey.

https://atrendia.typeform.com/to/mOfVcp

After you take the survey, we will send you a report recommending the solutions best for your needs.

Why are there different components instead of one software?

Having several components allows greater flexibility to choose a solution that best fits each individual’s needs. For some, LeanMail InstantArchive may be enough. The LeanMail Suite is our most sold solution.

Where can I get more information about LeanMail?

Contact us at: info@leanmail.com

or call
In Europe:
+34 696 259 660
+45 3695 0390

In the US
+1 415 799 9660

In the Pacific
+61 (0)413 830 772

Instructions to request a LeanMail activation key
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Does LeanMail work with Office 365?

Yes, with the desktop version, but it does not work with the browser version because Microsoft has not made the appropriate technology available yet.

Will LeanMail work on my mobile phone/tablet?

LeanMail currently provides a free app for iPhone V or higher. Search for “LeanMail” in your iPhone app store.

Do you have LeanMail for Mac?

No. Instead, we train our method without software. While not as efficient as our software-based training, it is still better than any other method..

Is LeanMail software safe?

Over 200 companies including Fortune 500 Companies use our software.

The software itself does not store any information about you, your emails or anything else.  All the information is stored on your Exchange Server, so there is no risk of losing or dispersing information.

Windows Defender SmartScreen is blocking the installation. Is your program safe?

Yes, absolutely. Whenever we make a new upgrade and create a new build to distribute to our users, Windows may temporarily block the installation because the file is new and Windows doesn’t have enough information to guarantee its safety. It can take a few weeks for Windows to remove this warning. Luckily, you can accept the downloaded file:

How do I know which LeanMail version I have?
  1. Click on the LeanMail Options drop-down in the LeanMail Toolbar
  2. Choose Options
  3. Find Version nr. at the top of the dialog box

 

How does the LeanMail installation process work?
  1. Download the LeanMail software
  2. Close Outlook if it is in use.
  3. Install the software.
  4. Open Outlook.

Here are all the support videos

You will need to make sure that your antivirus software is turned off in the process.

Where are my emails? I can’t find them in the LeanMail Archive when I archive them.

If you find that emails are disappearing when you click on the LeanMail InstantArchive button, it’s probably because they are going to a new LeanMail Archive folder which was created because LeanMail couldn’t find your old folder.  This could be because you deleted it, moved it to another folder group, etc.

First, we should locate where your emails are going by creating a test email and archiving it using the LeanMail InstantArchive button.  You will have to search your folder tree to find any folders called LeanMail Archive.  One will be the old folder and one will be the new one.  Once you locate the old one, move the contents of the folder to the new one and delete it.  Now drag the new one to the favorites to have a virtual copy there.

What companies are using LeanMail, and what has been their experience?
Why would LeanMail be a good fit for my company?

That’s the question we need to consider when we start our dialogue. The most important reason is usually because your employees spend a huge portion of their day managing email without abiding by a best practice. Why not start with the best?

LeanMail is employed in over 200 companies on five continents.

99.1% of all the people we have introduced LeanMail to say that they love the method. 86.4% stick to it.

What are the main benefits of LeanMail for my organization?

There are an enormous number of benefits for your organization, but we’ll just list the top 10 here:

  1. Eliminate wasted time in the area where employees spend a great deal of time.
  2. Greatly reduce stress and therefore reduced absenteeism.
  3. Eliminate late and lost emails.
  4. Enable employees to have a dashboard view of their emails, giving them a contextual way of perceiving their workload.
  5. Employees work by priority rather than first in last out.
  6. Emails are answered according to priority and urgency in order to maximize output.
  7. The reduced time spent on email will free up time for sales, customer service and other core work.
  8. Less multi-tasking since LeanMail enables employees to batch their work.
  9. A standard work practice for email is established and, most importantly, maintained.
  10. Standardized archiving procedures are also part of LeanMail.
Is it simple to add new LeanMail licenses?

As simple as giving us a name and an email address.

Can’t you configure Outlook to do most of the things that the LeanMail add-in can?
This is actually a pretty loaded question because it makes three assumptions:  1) the LeanMail method is all about the LeanMail add-in 2) it is possible to come close to the configuration that we have devised in the LeanMail add-in (throughout the course of six years and thousands of man-hours of customer interviews, design and programming) and 3) that if you could somehow configure Outlook similarly to how we have adapted it with the LeanMail tool you could blissfully sail through the management of your emails and suddenly develop all the good habits that would enable you to miraculously change your ways.

Unfortunately, many IT managers ask this question with more than a bit of skepticism regarding the uniqueness of the LeanMail add-in.  Our response is:  show us how you did it, and then show us the results of your training after three months and we’ll compare your numbers with our numbers.  Never once has anyone come back to us because they very quickly see that just because they can paint it red, put in a big engine and some fat tires, it will never be a Ferrari  – and worse, no one will want to drive their creation so they can forget about scaling it throughout the organization.

Without getting into too much detail, there are a few things that you certainly can do by configuring Outlook.  You can devise all sorts of rules and have people drag emails to tasks and all kinds of folders. (LeanMail eliminates almost all folders)  There are countless books that cover this.  Then there are plenty of competitors to LeanMail like www.clearcontext.com , www.gtd.com , http://www.franklincovey.com/tc/software-and-applications/ and many others.  They all claim to do the same thing that LeanMail does: give you control over your inbox.

But it is very easy to see that we got a few things right that none of the others did:

  1. The LeanMail method is not tool based.  The tool was created to facilitate the habit.  That becomes abundantly clear from the first training.
  2. The LeanMail method is comprised of two steps.  Just take a look at the complexity of all the others.  You’ll want to pull your hair out every time you have to process an email.
  3. It’s very easy to re-mount the horse if you fall off LeanMail for a few days.  The other methods are so complex that you’ll have to look up things in the manual.  We have one but no one ever uses it unless they want to learn more about our philosophy – which is awesome.
  4. Look at the testimonials from our clients.  It says it all – and many have tried the other methods.
How can I edit a note I have created in Outlook with LeanMail?

To correct a note, drag and drop the email from the LeanMail Archive to the Inbox.  Change the note, then click on the InstantArchive button.

Why are my project folders empty when I put emails inside? All my project folders have emails inside, but sometimes when I click “open project folder” they are empty.

Occasionally the project folders can get out of sync.  Just restart Outlook and they should return.

How can I see the subject in my Today view?

The reason we remove the subject line from the Today view by default is because you shouldn’t need it if your Next Actions are written correctly.

The main benefit of Next Actions is to enable you to quickly identify what you need to do next in order to progress with that particular email.  Having the information you need concentrated into two to four words (generally) in one field allows you to scan your email task list much more rapidly than combining information from two fields.

A common argument is that a lot of information you need for the Next Action is already in the subject line.  Our counter argument is:  Yes, sometimes it’s in the subject line, but quite often it is not.  Ambiguity is what kills systems.  By being able to always rely on Next Actions, you protect your system.

Subject lines, since they are often created by someone else, can be confusing especially if the thread has veered from the original discussion.  Next Actions, however, can always be relied upon.

While we recommend improving your Next Actions instead of opting to have the subject line in your Today view, there is a way to get it back:

1. Click on the LeanMail Options dropdown in the toolbar.

2. Choose Options.

3. Click in the box ‘Show Received and Subject in Today view’

 

What are some tips on writing good next actions?

Errors that LeanMail beginners make in the planning step

A few of the typical entries that many LeanMail novices write as Next Actions:

‘Follow-up’    ‘Read’    ‘Read and revert’   ‘Call’   

 

At the time you write them, they make perfect sense because at that particular moment you were immersed in the details of what it was you were supposed to do.  The problem occurs three days or occasionally even five minutes later when you scratch your head wondering, hmmm…Follow up what?  Read what?  Read and revert about what? Call about what? Your memory, that was so clear for you when you wrote the Next Action suddenly fails you, so you click on the email and do what you wanted to avoid in the first place: you re-read and re-analyze the email.

 

Let’s be clear:  Next Actions are keywords you write in the Next Action column to remind yourself of exactly WHAT the very next action you need to take to execute the task that you deciphered by analyzing the email.  Next Actions are not categories, nor are they long descriptions.  It should not be taxing for your brain to be tipped off as to what the next step is for each mail as your eyes pan downwards looking for the most appropriate thing to do in your list of emails.

If you read a Next Action and find yourself pounding your head because you don’t remember what it meant, it will be because the Next Action was not written well enough.  Normally this is due to one of four possibilities:

1) You were too hasty and didn’t comprehend exactly what you needed to do next and just wrote the first thing that came to mind to fill in the blank

2) Your Next Action was too abbreviated

3) Your Next Action was not specific enough (Most Common)

4) You relied on the Sender or Subject line to decipher the Next Action.

Don’t worry.  You’re not alone.  LeanMail beginners are infamous for not writing clear and concise Next Actions and believing that they can solve the world’s problems in one day.

Let’s first focus on clear and concise Next Actions.

Next Actions should grease the wheel of action.  They should put you on the edge of execution.  If only I would do “x” (X being the Next Action), this task would begin to get solved.  You don’t have to solve the entire problem; you just want to take it to the next level.  You don’t even have to know how to solve the problem.  All you need to think is: What do I need to do to move this one step forward. That’s it! In many cases, that’s how the problem is solved completely.

So, although a Next Action is simple enough to comprehend as a concept, we shouldn’t be deceived about its robust power.  The reason it is so powerful is because it forces us to concentrate on fixing the problem.  You can’t move forward (entering a When-date) without filling in that blank space.  In effect, we’re saying ambivalence is not allowed.  You can’t advance to the next step (filling in the When date) without doing the work that will bring you one step closer to execution.

You have to do it anyway.

What makes this a no-brainer, is the fact that at some point, you simply must figure out what the Next Action is.  There is no avoiding it.  It would be impossible to reply; confirm; send information; attach a document; etc., without knowing what it was you were supposed to do next.  Therefore, the only extra work LeanMail requires is typing in a keyword summary in the Next Action field, which takes between four and seven seconds.  Remember too, that you only need Next Actions for mails that you can’t resolve in less than two minutes.  Those that require less time should be answered immediately.

Think about the time you will spend writing Next Actions.  On average, a person needs about two minutes for each batch of 25 mails you don’t answer immediately using the 2-minute rule.  Ponder this:  How long would it take you to re-read and analyze those 25 mails, not once, but several times – as you have been doing for years?  I think we can agree that whatever figure you come up with, it will total a minimum of twice as long as it takes to review a list of 25 Next Actions.  Now add to that, that even with the best memory, you would be very hard pressed to then remember which ones should be grouped together and on what specific date they would be best answered.  Do you have 50 mails to answer today?  Which ones absolutely need to be answered?  Which ones can wait until Thursday?

Attaining a high level of efficiency and effectiveness in your inbox would be daunting without Next Actions and When-dates.  How did we ever do it before?  The answer is, unfortunately, quite poorly.

Conquering the world in one day. 

 

How can we, on the one hand be excellent at procrastinating, and on the other plan to do everything today?  The answer is that planning and doing are birds of a different feather.  Most of us, when we see a to-do list don’t calculate how much time each item will take and then sum up the list.  No.  We see a list of fifteen or twenty items as if it’s a shopping list — stuff that needs to get done without acknowledging the amount of time it will take to complete it.

Since you’ve already completed the items that take two minutes or less, using the two-minute rule, a list of fifteen items will take an absolute minimum of 30 minutes to complete.  It will take an hour if you are completely focused on just those items, and more like 90 minutes in a typical workday situation.

Now look at the clock. Look at your calendar and now back to your Today view.  If you’re like most beginners, you’ll probably realize that you’re trying to break the laws of physics.  But don’t worry, it’s easy to fix.  Just go to your All view and IMMEDIATELY move what you won’t be able to get done today to more appropriate dates (not just tomorrow or you’ll be repeating the same problem) by dragging and dropping the mails.

Now I’m going to tell you a secret.  Don’t tell anyone else this secret.  It’s only for people who put in the effort to read this text.  Here it is:  You can disable the need to write in Next Actions in the LeanMail Options. That means, that if you choose this option, mails will pass through the Plan stage with just a date in the When column.  Now I’m telling you this not because I recommend it, but because some people love LeanMail, but will never be bothered with Next Actions and I don’t want to throw the baby out with the bath water.

But before you go hunting for that button, read this:

Why would anyone not employ the use of Next Actions? 

 

Typically, there are three reasons. The first reason is that the initial impression of writing Next Actions is that it requires a lot of thinking and extra administrative work because for the first time in your life you are forced into moving every mail at least a baby step in the direction of progress due to the pressure of maintaining the method – not because a mail warrants it.

We can all agree that working systematically is a good thing, but it feels heavy – especially in the first few weeks – compared to the old way of deleting junk (no heavy work there) and answering the easy stuff (also very light-weight).  When we finally do execute the tough mails (often after the second or third read-through) we do so under some psychological pressure of particular mails.  If you only knew the number of executives who have told me that they don’t answer mails unless someone either sends them another email to remind them or calls them.  How’s that for efficiency – never mind a culture of extreme frustration?

The second reason is because some people feel that their memory is good enough.  I remember the sender and the subject line.  That’s good enough for me.  And it is – if they want to continue at the level of effectiveness they are at.

Anyone who has been entering good Next Actions for a few months will certainly agree that you would need a photographic memory to be able to come close to competing with the Next Action and When method.  Unfortunately, the less curious are content with their own method and never get to experience the huge increase in effectiveness.  It reminds me of people who have developed their own made-up systems for typing and believe that they would not be faster if they learned the ten-finger system.  The fact that they must look at their fingers much of the time does not dissuade them in the least.  In both these cases it would be pointless to try to convince these people because they are not willing to investigate a new way due to their complacency.

The third reason for not using Next Actions is because you slowly got off track when things heated up. You understand the value of Next Actions but you found yourself with one foot in the system and one foot out.  Instead of getting coaching or finding twenty minutes to get back on track, you gave up.

Luckily there are remedies for each of these situations.  If you’re struggling with the amount of administrative time Next Actions seem to take, fear not.  Most people struggle at first.  To beat this problem simply accept that it will take a few days and maybe even a couple of weeks before it will “click” for you.  Hopefully, knowing that many new users struggle with this feeling – and then go on to become email superstars, will put this fear to rest and you will continue to train yourself.

This reminds me of the time I got my first pair of tri-focal glasses (Oh heavens, I’ve just aged myself).  The optician sold me on the most expensive glasses I had ever heard of, but promised me that they would be incredible.  I would be able to see near, far, and even read brilliantly on my computer screen.  But, he warned, it would take six weeks for me to get used to them.  Five weeks and one day later I came back to him and complained that I still had problems adjusting between the three lenses.  He looked at his calendar, looked at me incredulously and scolded me in an irritated voice that it hadn’t been six weeks yet.  “But…”, I protested. “- I said six weeks.” He interrupted.  Four days later, the glasses clicked.  It still amazes me that he could be that precise, but there you have it.

I can’t say whether it will take six weeks or ten weeks, but somewhere in there you will click with LeanMail if you follow the method religiously — and you won’t go back to your old way. Ever.

How good is your memory – really?  When it comes to memory, here’s an easy and very convincing test: Follow the LeanMail Prioritize and Plan method.  When all your mails are prioritized and planned, go to the All mails view and drag down and drop the Priority, When and Next Action columns so that they disappear (don’t worry, they will reappear when you switch views and switch back again.)  Now sort your mails by received.  At this point, you are seeing how you used to view your emails.  Can you see what you need to do today?  Can you find the four most important mails due today?  Are you clear about what you should do about every mail – and when it needs doing?  Of course not.  You’re back to searching for important things and re-reading like crazy.

Finally, if you do get off track, you can just call us at LeanMail or speak to your project manager.  You’ll be amazed at how fast you can get back on track with just a little hand-holding and some basic coaching.  Remember, we all want the same thing: excellence!

What do we do when the LeanMail add-in has disappeared from Outlook?

Sometimes Microsoft updates and Anti-virus software deactivates the LeanMail add-in.  Luckily it’s easy to fix:

My LeanMail toolbar has changed. The buttons have collapsed into one big button.

The reason is that you have too many objects in your ribbon.  We suggest removing ‘Get insights’ and  ‘Get add-ins’

To do this, right-click on your ribbon and choose “customize the ribbon”.

In the dialog box (see below), find the objects you want to remove, then click OK.  Once you have removed enough objects, you will see your toolbar in the usual way.

Where can I find the emails marked as Personal with LeanMail?

The Plan and Today views have three levels: High, Normal and Personal.  You will find your personal mails in the third, Personal level (at the bottom of the list).

How can I change a batch of emails to a different category?

Just go to the category list and change each of the categories to the one you want to use.  All the categories on all the emails will then be converted to the desired one.

How to set up quick-key for archiving using the keyboard only?

 

 

 

 

How can I get LeanMail to automatically categorize emails by sender?

Select one email from the sender that you want to automatically categorize.

Click on the InstantArchive dropdown and choose Archive and assign category to sender.

How can I get LeanMail to automatically categorize threads?

Go to LeanMail options and click the option “Enable categorization of threads”

How can I unassign emails from a certain sender to be automatically assigned to a certain category?

You can delete any presetting going into File/Rules and Alerts.

In the Rules and Alerts menu just unmark the rule you don’t want and click OK.

How do you turn off the request for a note when archiving?

To turn off the notes you have to go to LeanMail options/options

Then uncheck the option “Require note when archiving” as show in the picture below.

Can I delete a category from my categories list?

Yes, and you should weed out categories you do not use anymore.

Open the Master category list.

Select the category you want to delete (not the check-box), click on Delete.

The category will be deleted from the list, but not from any of the items.

 

 

What is the best way of searching emails with more than one category in the LeanMail Archive and Master Archive?

An email that has more than one category will virtually appear in all the categories that you have added to it.  I.e. if you give a mail the categories: Bank, Finances and First National Bank, you can find the mail under all three categories.  If you delete the mail, it will be deleted from all three categories as well.  It is simply duplicated under the different categories.  That’s why there are more emails in your LeanMail Archive if you sort by category than if you sort any other way.

How to search for emails using universal search in Outlook?

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/learn-to-narrow-your-search-criteria-for-better-searches-in-outlook-d824d1e9-a255-4c8a-8553-276fb895a8da

Why are there two LeanMail Archives?

 

LeanMail provides two folders for archiving:  The LeanMail Archive and the LeanMail Master Archive.

The LeanMail archive is where emails are moved to once the InstantArchive button is clicked on.  Before it moves to the archive, one or more categories is added, and, optionally, a note is added if there is no Next Action on the email being archived.

In order to reduce the number of emails one has to look through in order to search out a particular email, we physically move “Older” emails (older than last month) to the LeanMail Master Archive.

By working this way, the LeanMail Archive has the approximately 5% of your emails you need 95% of the time and the LeanMail Master Archive has 95% of your emails that you are searching for 5% of the time.

Important note:  You can break some functionality by moving the LeanMail Archive.  If you do, it is possible that LeanMail will not find it and thus replace it with a new LeanMail Archive and begin moving emails to the new LeanMail Archive perhaps called LeanMail Archive1.

You may, however, move the LeanMail Master Archive wherever you like.  Some organizations like to put it in a .pst file, though with the larger amount of space being allocated these days, the use of .pst’s is falling out of favor.  If you move the LeanMail Master Archive, be sure to right-click on the folder and choose “add to favorites” or drag it up to the favorites section for quick access.

How can I ensure that employees retain the LeanMail method?

Just because we know something is good for us doesn’t mean we’ll take the medicine, eat our vegetables, go to the gym or stop smoking.

Most users will agree that LeanMail provides a platform from which one can be in total control of their email – if they follow the regimen.  In the beginning, managing email in the new way goes swimmingly.  Then life happens.  Many come to believe that they receive too much mail or have too little time in order to follow the method.  Others feel that the method is too administrative.

In general, LeanMail users fall into two groups:

1. Those who are consistent in following the method as they manage email

2. Those who use LeanMail to “clean up”.

The former group understands that LeanMail is not an afterthought, but a way of managing email.  They have adopted the two-step approach and follow it thoroughly.

The latter, however, are inconsistent with their practice.  They tend to do only parts of the method.  Even if they were convinced in the first few weeks, they are no longer convinced.

Like swimming, you cannot expect to float if you do not continually make strokes in the water.  You cannot make strokes sometimes because you will lose buoyancy and sink.  The LeanMail method keeps you afloat because it supports and guides you in working in an efficient way.  As soon as you return to old habits, however, you not only lose buoyancy, you lose speed.  It’s as if the swimming lane just got longer because of the redundancies (re-reading, re-deciding, searching).

Worse, because of the micro-task nature of email, the detours we take don’t register until we’re overloaded.

There is hope, however.

Remember that first week when you seemed to be in complete control of your inbox?  Or maybe it lasted three months before it started to erode?  We need to return to that level and receive a small amount of help through regular mini check-ups that will be just enough of a push to keep us on track.

How is LeanMail implemented?

The most successful way of implementing LeanMail is by carrying out a needs investigation followed by a pilot and then rolling it out to the parts of the organization that will benefit.

Can LeanMail work with Lotus Notes or Gmail?

No

What is the best way to start with LeanMail?

There are three excellent ways to start:

  1. If your organization has 50 or more employees, we always suggest investigating what is working and what is not before beginning your journey. This way you can close the gap with the least amount of resources.

2.  If an initial investigation is not possible, you can do a technical pilot of up to 8 persons first.

3.  You can start with just one module; LeanMail InstantArchive, to test the waters. Even though InstantArchive is just a small part of LeanMail, instantly filing              and finding mail will give your organization a good indication of the power of LeanMail in no time at all.

The menu on my message disappeared. How do I get it back?

Click on any tab in the message, i.e. File, or Message

The menu will drop down, and in the right-hand corner you will see a small thumbtack.

Click on the thumbtack.

You probably accidentally clicked on it’s ugly cousin, the up-pointing chevron whose function is to hide ribbons.

If I only want to have LeanMail, how do I remove Inbox480 from my Outlook?

If you want to remove Inbox480 from your Outlook, but not LeanMail:

1. Go to LeanMail options/options.

2. Make sure your User Mode is set to “Show LeanMail features” NOT “Show LeanMail and Inbox480 features” as shown in the picture below.

3. Click OK.

Why don’t I see the Project Folders that I just made?

Project folders will not be visible in the folder tree until they are populated with at least one email.

How do I add icons to the quick access toolbar?

How do you search within a category?

Adding a note to emails you categorize is the best way. One or two words help you quickly identify what you are looking for.

You can also hold the shift button and click on From, To, or Subject to second sort.

How do you stop from needing to click the home tab to see the LeanMail toolbar?

Double-click on the Home tab.  Presto-change-o!

Another option is to right-click on the top left-hand menu above home or file and get this menu:

Uncollapse the Ribbon by removing the check-mark (not shown here)

How do you turn on/off the Favorites in the folder navigation pane?

How can we set email alerts for individual senders?
Locate the drop-down menu on the LeanMail toolbar between the InstantArchive and the Categories button and follow these instructions:

 

 

 

 

 

Add as many contacts to this list as you like:

 

LeanMail Tip – What if I’m overwhelmed with emails?

One thing that helps me when I get clobbered with mail is to set all my emails for tomorrow.  Then I go through them, putting the urgent ones for today and the less urgent in the future.  When I’m done, I don’t have too many for today, and tomorrow is reasonable.

Why do some of my emails look as though they haven’t been opened when I know I have read them?

In some cases, the reading pane options need to be changed in order for a mail to be registered as read because a delay is set.

Go to Outlook File/Options/Mail/Reading Pane.  Remove the number in the box: Wait ___ seconds before marking item as read.

How do I turn off the message preview for each email?

To deactivate the preview line:

1. Go to View

2. Message Preview

3. Change 1 Line to Off for all folders.

How can I ensure that employees retain the LeanMail method?

Just because we know something is good for us doesn’t mean we’ll take the medicine, eat our vegetables, go to the gym or stop smoking.

Most users will agree that LeanMail provides a platform from which one can be in total control of their email – if they follow the regimen.  In the beginning, managing email in the new way goes swimmingly.  Then life happens.  Many come to believe that they receive too much mail or have too little time in order to follow the method.  Others feel that the method is too administrative.

In general, LeanMail users fall into two groups:

1. Those who are consistent in following the method as they manage email

2. Those who use LeanMail to “clean up”.

The former group understands that LeanMail is not an afterthought, but a way of managing email.  They have adopted the two-step approach and follow it thoroughly.

The latter, however, are inconsistent with their practice.  They tend to do only parts of the method.  Even if they were convinced in the first few weeks, they are no longer convinced.

Like swimming, you cannot expect to float if you do not continually make strokes in the water.  You cannot make strokes sometimes because you will lose buoyancy and sink.  The LeanMail method keeps you afloat because it supports and guides you in working in an efficient way.  As soon as you return to old habits, however, you not only lose buoyancy, you lose speed.  It’s as if the swimming lane just got longer because of the redundancies (re-reading, re-deciding, searching).

Worse, because of the micro-task nature of email, the detours we take don’t register until we’re overloaded.

There is hope, however.

Remember that first week when you seemed to be in complete control of your inbox?  Or maybe it lasted three months before it started to erode?  We need to return to that level and receive a small amount of help through regular mini check-ups that will be just enough of a push to keep us on track.

Where can I find log files for Inbox480 and LeanMail?

To find log files for Inbox480 and LeanMail, follow the path for each below

C:\Users\Name\AppData\Roaming\Inbox480 AddIn

C:\Users\Name\AppData\Roaming\LeanMail AddIn

Can a company transfer its licences to another company?

YES, if the the company is transferring the rights to a sub-company we continue to bill the mother company, otherwise NO for the following reasons:

1. We have standard framework agreements with all the companies we do business with.  We need to have this agreement in order for an employee to use our software for legal and contractual reasons.

2. We have minimum license requirements for various sizes of companies because it is too expensive to maintain our professional level of service when too few users in any particular company are being maintained.

Having said that, there are several things we can do in order to make the transition smooth.

1.      Find out who the new Project Owner or Purchaser will be at the new company.

2.      Arrange a meeting to introduce LeanMail and explain our licensing agreement.

3.      Arrange for their IT department to be issued our software for testing and acceptance.

If one person in an organization uses LeanMail, does everyone need to?

The short answer is no.  But this question is asked only by those uninitiated to LeanMail.  Once you begin your journey, you’ll ask: Which modules would be best suited for each team?

What happens if I stop using LeanMail?

All the mails in your LeanMail Archive and LeanMail Master Archive will remain there and they will keep their categories.  If you wish to return to the heirarchical folder system, you can simply sort your emails by category (default) and drag and drop your emails into folders.

Regarding the emails in your inbox, just click on the View tab/Change view/Compact and you will see your emails as they were before the training.

If you have Project Folders, they will remain under your root folder.

What if I decide that I don’t like LeanMail? Can I go back to my old way without much trouble?

Going back to your old way would require you to uninstall the software and change a view in your settings. That’s it.

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